Without Clinical Trials, FDA Authorizes Modified Monkeypox Vaccine, Expands Eligibility to ‘High-Risk’ Children

Bypassing normal clinical trial guidance, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday expanded the Emergency Use Authorization for the Jynneos monkeypox vaccine to allow for an alternative method of injection and for “high-risk” children under 18 to get the vaccine.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Tuesday expanded the Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for the Jynneos monkeypox vaccine to allow for an alternative method of injection the agency said would help conserve low supplies.

The expanded EUA also allows the vaccine to be used in children under age 18 who are at “high risk” of infection.

Prior to issuing the expanded EUA, the FDA confirmed that “numerous” children were granted access to the vaccine on a “case-by-case basis” through a special permission process — even though the vaccine was not approved or authorized for emergency use in that age group — ABC News reported on Aug. 4.

News of the potential dose-sparing recommendations prompted some congressional staff — including from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services — to question federal health officials about whether using the alternative injection method could affect the efficacy of the shot.

“They seemed to have no good answers for us, other than denying that it would impact things,” an individual who attended a briefing on the matter told Politico. “But they didn’t present any data.”

According to CNBC, monkeypox is rarely fatal and no deaths have been reported in the U.S. However, some patients need to be hospitalized to manage lesions, which can be painful.

Read More: Without Clinical Trials, FDA Authorizes Modified Monkeypox Vaccine, Expands Eligibility to ‘High-Risk’ Children

Robot Arms Replace Shelf Stockers In Japan Stores, Targets World

Telexistence Inc. and FamilyMart Co. are rolling out a fleet of AI-driven robots to restock shelves in 300 convenience stores across Japan.

The robot arms are designed to replenish drinks in refrigerators and are now in mass production, Tokyo-based Telexistence said in a statement Wednesday. They’ll be installed in FamilyMart locations across major metropolitan areas later this month and help relieve store workers while also filling the void left by a shrinking workforce in the country.

Dubbed TX SCARA — standing for Selective Compliance Assembly Robot Arm — the machines are largely autonomous, with remote piloting as a fallback option should the artificial intelligence fail or encounter out-of-place items. Each unit can replace one to three hours of human work per day per store, Telexistence said.

“The decline in Japan’s labor population is one of the key management issues for FamilyMart to continue stable store operations,” said Tomohiro Kano, general manager at FamilyMart. “The newly created time can be reallocated to customer service and shop floor enhancement.”

FamilyMart will pay Telexistence a monthly fee for the robot’s labor, its maintenance and the support of remote workers who can pilot the arm using a virtual reality headset when needed. The bots can work without human assistance 98% of the time, Telexistence said.

US tech giants Microsoft Corp. and Nvidia Corp. collaborated with Telexistence on the development and technology of the bots. The SCARA arms use Nvidia’s Jetson AI platform to process information and Microsoft’s Azure cloud infrastructure to record and reference sales data to optimize restocking tasks.

Read More: Robot Arms Replace Shelf Stockers In Japan Stores, Targets World

IRS Pulls Job Post Detailing How New Accounting Agents May Use ‘Deadly Force’ After Backlash

The Internal Revenue Service just deleted a job posting page from its website detailing duties for prospective new agents, including using “deadly force if necessary” during tax audits.

The job description states:

As a Special Agent you will combine your accounting skills with law enforcement skills to investigate financial crimes. Special Agents are duly sworn law enforcement officers who are trained to “follow the money.” No matter what the source, all income earned, both legal and illegal, has the potential of becoming involved in crimes which fall within the investigative jurisdiction of the IRS Criminal Investigation. Because of the expertise required to conduct these complex financial investigations, IRS Special Agents are considered the premier financial investigators for the Federal government.

The “major duties” included in the IRS Special Agent (SA) job description require a willingness to “carry a firearm and be willing to use deadly force, if necessary.”

And for an annual salary of $50,704-$89,636, SAs are required to work a “minimum of 50 hours per week” and be “willing and able to participate in arrests, execution of search warrants, and other dangerous assignments.”

The job posting page was quickly removed from the IRS jobs website following massive blowback on social media.

The Democrats view the American people as the enemy. “Special agents, who can be placed around the nation and world, have an interesting job, according to the IRS description. They are financial analysts and armed officers ready for a shootout.” https://t.co/pGpqR1BmlY

— Tammy Bruce (@HeyTammyBruce) August 10, 2022

Read More: Robot Arms Replace Shelf Stockers In Japan Stores, Targets World